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Reprinted from

Lewis Topographical Directory.

 

ABBEYSIDE, a village and suburb of the borough of DUNGARVAN, in the barony of DECIES-without-DRUM, county of WATERFORD, and province of MUNSTER, containing 1859 inhabitants. This place derives its name from the remains of an ancient abbey, which is described in the article on Dungarvan; it is situated on an inlet of the bay, and is included within the electoral boundary of the borough of Dungarvan. The R. C. chapel for the district of East Dungarvan is situated here.

ACHILLBEG, an island, in the parish of ACHILL, barony of BURRISHOOLE, county of MAYO, and province of Connaught, 22 miles (W.) from Newport-Pratt: the population is returned with the parish. This island is situated on the western coast, and on the north side of the entrance of Clew bay; it is separated from the larger island of Achill by a narrow sound, which in some parts is fordable and almost dry at low water. The western shore is very wild, and, in consequence of the swells running to a great height, is unapproachable even in the calmest weather. It comprises about 200 statute acres, the property of Sir Richard A. O'Donnell, Bart.; a small portion of the land is arable, and the remainder is rocky pasture. A coast-guard station has been established here, and is one of the six stations constituting the district of Westport.

 

ADAM'S ISLE, an islet in the parish of CASTLEHAVEN, Eastern Division of the barony of WEST CARBERY, county of CORK, and province of MUNSTER. It is situated in the harbour of Castlehaven, off Shillenragga Head.

 

 

ADDERGOOLE, a parish, in the barony of TYRAWLEY, county of MAYO, and province of Connaught, 5 miles (S. by E.) from Crossmolina; containing 6725 inhabitants. This parish is situated on Lough Conn, by which it is bounded on the north, and on the road from Crossmolina to Castlebar: it contains within its limits the greater portion of the stupendous mountain of Nephin, which rises to a height of 2640 feet above the level of the sea. The land generally is under an improved system of tillage; there are large tracts of bog and mountain, which have been reclaimed to a great extent; and limestone abounds in the parish. Castle Hill is the seat of Major Cormick; Woodpark, beautifully situated on Lough Conn, of J. Anderson, Esq.; and Carrowkeel, of W. Bourke, Esq. A fair is held at Laherdane on the 29th of June, and at Ballagheen on the 24th of June. The parish is in the diocese of Killala; the rectory is partly appropriate to the precentorship, and partly to the vicars choral, of the cathedral of Christchurch, Dublin; the vicarage forms part of the union of Crossmolina. The tithes amount to £250, of which £13. 10. is payable to the precentor, £111. 10. to the vicars choral, and £125 to the vicar. The R. C. parish is co-extensive with that of the Established Church; the chapel is at Laherdane. There are two public schools, in which are about 130 boys and 30 girls; and six hedge schools, in which are about 160 boys and 70 girls. There are some remains of an old abbey at Addergoole, and also at Bofinan; and near Castle Hill are vestiges of an ancient castle.

ADNITH, or ATHNETt, a parish, in the barony of ELIOGARTY, county of TIPPERARY, and province of MUNSTER, 4 1/4 miles (S. by E.) from Templemore, on the river Suir, and on the road from Thurles to Templemore and Rathdowney; containing 253 inhabitants. It comprises 826 statute acres, and in the Down survey and county books is not noticed as a parish, but as forming a part of the parish of Rahelty, which was part of the possessions of the abbey of Woney. It is a vicarage, in the diocese of Cashel, and forms part of the union of Thurles; the rectory is impropriate in Edward Taylor, Esq. The tithes amount to £72, of which £39 is payable to the impropriator, and the remainder to the vicar. In the R. C. divisions also it is part of the union or district of Thurles.

ADREGOOLE, or ADDERGOOLE, a parish, in the barony of DONMORE, county of GALWAY, and province of Connaught, 4 miles (W.) from Dunmore, on the river Clare, and on the road from Dunmore to Castlebar; containing 2842 inhabitants. A constabulary police force has been stationed here; and petty sessions are held every alternate week. It is a vicarage, in the diocese of Tuam, and forms part of the union of Tuam; the rectory is appropriate partly to the deanery and partly to the archdeaconry of Tuam. The tithes amount to £137. 8. 2 1/2., of which £103. 1. 1 1/2. is payable to the dean and archdeacon, and £34. 7. 1. to the incumbent. At Kilconly there is a chapel of ease. In the R. C. divisions the parish is the head of a union or district, comprising also that of Liskeevy; the chapel, a large slated building recently erected, is situated at Milltown. There are three pay schools, in which are about 170 boys and 60 girls.

AFFANE, a parish, in the barony of DECIES-without-DRUM, county of WATERFORD, and province of MUNSTER, 4 miles (E. by S.) from Lismore, on the mail road from Waterford, through Youghal, to Cork; containing 1879 inhabitants. This place, called anciently Arthmean, or Aghmean, was, in 1564, the scene of a battle between the Earls of Desmond and Ormonde, in which the Earl of Ormonde was defeated with the loss of 280 of his men. It is chiefly distinguished as containing Dromana, which was for a long time the chief seat of the Fitz-geralds of the Decies, who were descendants of James, the seventh Earl of Desmond, and one of whom, in 1569, was created "Baron of Dromany and Viscount Desses," which titles became extinct at his decease. His nephew and second successor in the estate entertained at this place the celebrated Sir Walter Raleigh, who introduced here a fine species of cherry, which has continued to flourish in the neighbourhood to the present day, and is still in high estimation. The old castle having been burnt down in a period of hostility, the present mansion was erected on its site, and is now the property of H. Villiers Stuart, Esq., a descendant of the original possessors. The parish is bounded on the south-west by the river Blackwater, which is here navigable; it comprises 7530 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act; the land is in general fertile. The mansion of Mr. Stuart overhangs the Blackwater, which winds round the base of a precipitous ascent clothed with thriving plantations, and with its hanging gardens presents a picturesque and interesting feature. The other seats are Belleville Park, the residence of S. Poer, Esq., pleasantly situated amidst thriving plantations; Richmond, of Major Alcock; Mountrivers, of the Rev. G. Gumbleton, the vicar; Affane, of S. Power, Esq.; and Derriheen, of C. Maunsell, Esq. Fairs are held on May 14th, Aug. 12th, and Nov. 22nd. The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Lismore, to which the vicarage of Aglish was episcopally united in 1817, forming the union of Affane, in the patronage of the Duke of Devonshire, in whom the rectory is impropriate. The tithes amount to £369. 4. 7., payable in moieties to the impropriator and the vicar; and the gross amount of tithe for the whole benefice is £344. 12. 3 1/2. The church is a neat building, for the erection of which the late Board of First Fruits granted a loan of £500, in 1819. There is no glebe-house; the glebe contains only 2 roods and 20 perches. In the R. C. divisions this parish is one of the two which form the union of Modeligo; the chapel is at Boharavaughera. A school of 250 boys and 80 girls, at Carrageen, is aided by a legacy of £20 per annum from the late Mr. Magner.

AGHA, or AUGHA, a parish, in the barony of IDRONE EASt, county of CARLOW, and province of LEINSTER, comprising part of the market and post-town of Leighlin-bridge, and containing 1739 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the east side of the river Barrow, which is navigable to Waterford, and on the road from Carlow to Kilkenny. An abbey, called Achad-finglass, was founded here at a very early period by St. Fintan, and in 864, in which year it was plundered by the Danes, had risen into some note; its site is now unknown. The parish contains 4028 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act, and is wholly under cultivation; the system of agriculture is improving. Limestone for burning is procured within its limits. The principal seats are Rathwade, the residence of B.B. Newton, Esq., and Steuart Lodge, of W. R. Steuart, Esq. Fairs for the sale of live stock are held on Easter-Monday, May 14th, Sept. 23rd, and Dec. 27th; and there are two at Orchard on Whit-Tuesday and Oct. 2nd. It is a vicarage, in the diocese of Leighlin, and forms part of the union of Dunleckney; the rectory is impropriate in A. Weldon, Esq. The tithes amount to £415. 7. 8 1/4., of which £276. 18. 5 1/2. is payable to the impropriator, and £128. 9. 2 3/4. to the vicar. The church is in ruins. In the R. C. divisions it is partly in the union or district of Dunleckney, and partly in that of Old Leighlin: the chapel, situated at Newtown, is a handsome edifice lately erected. There are two schools for boys and girls; one situated at Leighlin-bridge, and the other, a large and handsome edifice lately built, near the R. C. chapel; they afford instruction to 120 boys and 230 girls. There is also a private pay school, in which are about 20 children; and a dispensary.-- See LEIGHLIN-BRIDGE.

AGHABOG, a parish, in the barony of DARTRY, county of MONAGHAN, and province of ULSTER, 1 mile (W.) from Newbliss, on the road from Clones to Ballybay; containing 7442 inhabitants. It comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 11,543 1/2 statute acres, of which 222 1/2 are covered with water, and 10,484 are arable and pasture land, applotted under the tithe act; there are also from 16 to 20 acres of woodland, and about 243 of bog. The soil is a rich but shallow loam on a deep, stiff, and retentive clay, which renders it wet unless drained and manured with lime and marl, but it produces naturally an abundant herbage: the inhabitants are nearly all engaged in the linen manufacture. Within the limits of the parish are five lakes, of which that near Leysborough demesne is the largest. Drumbrain is the neat residence of T. Phillips, Esq. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Clogher, and in the patronage of the Bishop: the tithes amount to £331. 3. 3. The church is a plain edifice, built in 1775, for which purpose the late Board of First Fruits gave £390. There is a glebe-house, with a glebe of 40 acres. In the R. C. divisions this parish forms part of the union of Killeevan: the chapel is a neat modern building, situated on the townland of Lathnamard. At Drumkeen there is a Presbyterian meeting-house, in connection with the Seceding Synod, and of the second class. There are seven public and two private schools in the parish. James Woodwright, Esq., of Gola, bequeathed £10 per ann. for the poor.

AGHABOLOGUE, a parish, in the barony of EAST MUSKERRY, county of CORK, and province of MUNSTER, 5 miles (E. N. E.) from Macroom; containing 5054 inhabitants. It comprises 18,130 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act, and valued at £6712 per annum. Its surface is very uneven and soil various: in the western and northern parts are several lofty hills, of which Knockgaun and Knockroer are the highest. On part of its eastern boundary, near the Dripsey, the soil is very productive; and the lands around Ahavrin are in a high state of cultivation. The state of agriculture has been much improved by the exertions of Capt. Crooke, Mr. Colthurst, and other proprietors, who have introduced a practical system of irrigation and draining, and the culture of green crops. The glen of Mullinassig abounds with beautiful and romantic scenery; both its sides are richly adorned with wood, and at its head, deeply seated amid towering rocks, is a little mill, below which the river forms a fine cascade, and a little lower falls into a beautiful lake. Numerous large and elegant houses are scattered over the parish: the principal are Clonmoyle, the seat of C. Colthurst, Esq.; Ahavrin House, of Capt, T. E. Crooke; Leeds, of F. Woodley, Esq.; Cooper's Ville, of W. Warsop Cooper, Esq.; Deelis, of R. Fuller Harnett, Esq.; Mountrivers, of N. Whiting, Esq.; Kilberehert, of R. B. Crooke, Esq.; the Cottage, of J. Pyne, Esq.; Rock Ville, of T. Radley, Esq.; Ahavrin Cottage, of the Rev. I. Smith; and Carrigadrohid, of the Rev. Pierce Green, P.P. The small demesne of Ahavrin is well planted; and on an isolated rock at its southern extremity stands a picturesque castellated tower, surmounted by a light and graceful turret. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Cloyne, and in the. patronage of the Bishop: the tithes amount to £750. 0. 5 1/2. The church is a small dilapidated structure, and is about to be rebuilt by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. There is no glebe-house; but adjoining the churchyard is a glebe of five acres, and another glebe of thirty acres was purchased at Ahavrin by the late Board of First Fruits, subject to an annual rental, which being too high, the rector never took possession of it. In the R. C. divisions this parish is the head of a union or district, which comprises also the parish of Magourney and a moiety of Aghinagh, and contains two chapels, situated at Aghabologue and Magourney: the former is a large and handsome edifice, in the pointed style of architecture, with a broad, flat, castellated bell turret. The parochial school for boys and girls is built on the glebe adjoining the church, and is endowed by the rector with the entire plot of glebe: there are also two hedge schools in the parish. Near the church is a celebrated well, dedicated to St. Olan. In the churchyard is St. Olan's Cap, a square stone, six feet high, inscribed with a number of Ogham characters, perfect and legible, with several others on the base covered by the soil; and close to the doorway leading into the church is a large ancient square font of grey marble, curiously moulded at the corners.

AGHACREW, or AUGHACREW, a parish, in the barony of KILNEMANAGH, county of TIPPERARY, and province of MUNSTER, 7 miles (N. N. E.) from Tipperary, on the new line of road from that place to Nenagh; containing 390 inhabitants. It comprises only 364 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act; and contains High Park, the residence of the Rev. John Hunt. It is in the diocese of Cashel, and the rectory is wholly appropriate to the Archbishop's mensal: the tithes amount to £40. 10. 4. There is no church: the Protestant inhabitants attend divine service at Toam, about three miles distant.

AGHACROSS.-- See AHACROSS.

AGHADA, or AHADA, a parish, partly in the barony of BARRYMORE, but chiefly in that of IMOKILLY, county of CORK, and province of MUNSTER, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Cloyne; containing 2512 inhabitants. This parish, which includes the small fishing village of Whitegate, is situated on the south side of Cork harbour, and on the road from Cloyne to Carlisle Fort. The village of Aghada occupies an elevated site, and contains the parish church and R. C. chapel. The village of Whitegate is a small fishing port, where several boats are employed in raising sand from the harbour, which is used for manure. On the north side of the parish a neat small pier has been constructed by subscription, where a steam-boat from Cork or Cove calls every Tuesday during the summer, and where coal and sand are occasionally landed. About 50 females are employed in platting Tuscan straw for exportation, and a few in platting the crested dog's tail, or "traneen," grass found here. The parish comprises 2331 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act: the greater part is under tillage, and nearly the whole of the remainder is pasture; there is very little waste land or bog. At Whitegate are two quarries of stone used for building. There are several handsome houses within its limits: the principal are Aghada House, the residence of J. Roche, Esq.; Whitegate House, of Mrs. Blakeney Fitzgerald; Careystown, of Mrs. Atkin; Hadwell Lodge, of J. Penrose, Esq.; Hadwell, of the Rev. Dr. Austen; Maryland House, of J. Haynes, Esq.; Rathcourcy, of J. Smith, Esq.; and the glebe-house, of the Rev. J. Gore. There is a coast-guard station at East Ferry. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Cloyne; it was united in the reign of Chas. II. to the rectories and vicarages of Corkbeg, Rostellan, Inch, and Kilteskin or Titeskin, which, from the time of Bishop Crow, in the reign of Anne, were held in commendam by the Bishop of Cloyne, till the death of Dr. Brinkley in 1835, when they were disunited by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, and made separate benefices, in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes amount to £292. 15. 6. The church, a neat structure, situated on an eminence above the harbour of Cove, was erected in 1812. The glebe-house adjoins it, and for its erection the late Board of First Fruits, in 1814, granted a loan of £1000 and a gift of £100: the glebe comprises 20 acres of profitable land. In the R. C. divisions the parish forms the head of a union or district, also called Saleen, which comprises the parishes of Aghada, Rostellan, Corkbeg, Inch, and Garranekenefeck, and contains three chapels, situated respectively in Aghada, Rostellan, and Inch; the first is a small plain edifice, built by the late John Roche, Esq., who, in 1818, founded a school. The parochial school at Farcet was founded by the late Bishop Brinkley, who endowed it with two acres of land from the glebe, and is further supported by the Marchioness of Thomond. A school at Whitegate Hill was founded in 1827, for 50 boys, by the late R. U. Fitzgerald, Esq., who endowed it with £500; and female and infants' schools have been built and are supported by his widow, Mrs. Blakeney Fitzgerald. In these schools about 100 boys and 50 girls receive instruction: there are also two private schools, in which are about 50 boys and 40 girls. In the village of Aghada are the picturesque ruins of the old church.

AGHADE, a parish, in the barony of FORTH, county of CARLOW, and province of LEINSTER, 2 3/4 miles (S.) from Tullow, on the river Slaney, and on the road from Tullow to Newtownbarry; containing 368 inhabitants. It comprises 1614 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act: the land is partly arable and partly pasture; a great portion of the latter is marshy, but might be improved by draining; the state of agriculture is very good. There are quarries of limestone and of a fine species of granite for building. Ballykealy is the residence of J. J. Lecky, Esq. The living is an impropriate curacy, endowed with two-thirds of the entire tithes, to which the vicarage of Ballon was recently united, and in the diocese of Leighlin and patronage of the Bishop; the remainder of the tithes are impropriate in Lord Downes. It was episcopally united, in 1710, to the rectory of Gilbertstown and the vicarages of Ardristin and Ballon, which union was dissolved in 1830, and divided into three distinct benefices. The tithes amount to £135, of which £45 is payable to the impropriator and £90 to the incumbent; and the entire tithes of the benefice amount to £170. The church, which is pleasantly situated on rising ground above a small stream, is a plain old building in indifferent repair, and is about to be newly roofed, for which the Ecclesiastical Commissioners have lately granted £591. There is neither glebe-house nor glebe. In the R. C. divisions the parish forms part of the union of Ballon and Ratoe, or district of Gilbertstown. There is a school, in which 57 boys are taught.

 

AGHADOE, a parish, in the barony of MAGONIHY, county of KERRY, and province of MUNSTER; containing, with part of the town of Killarney, 4796 inhabitants. This place was formerly the head of a bishop's see, merged from time immemorial into that of Ardfert, which, with Limerick, forms the bishoprick of Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe. The annals of Innisfallen state that a son of O'Donoghue was buried in an abbey founded here by him, which was standing in 1231. The only traces of its ancient dignity are the ruins of its cathedral, and the archdeaconry of Aghadoe, of which it still forms the corps. The parish is situated chiefly on the road from Killarney to Milltown and Tralee, and partly on that from Killarney to Cork: it comprehends within its limits the Island of Innisfallen, and part of the lakes of Killarney, and comprises 17,720 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act. The lands consist of a ridge of shaly rock hounding and overlooking the lake; and of a flat spreading towards the north into a wide expanse of wet bog, with shoals of gravel. On the expiration of the lease of this manor, held under its proprietor, Lord Headley, in 1826, his lordship took the estate under his own management; the farms, previously consisting of small portions of land held under middlemen by cottier tenants, were surveyed and improved upon an arrangement adapted to the mutual benefit of landlord and tenant, and let on leases of 21 years in portions varying from 100 to 200 acres, with stipulated allowances for building comfortable farm-houses, making fences and drains, and drawing the requisite quantities of lime for the improvement of the soil. Several miles of new road have been constructed, and extensive plantations made solely at his lordship's expense. The hovels formerly occupied by the cottier tenants have been superseded by good farm-houses built of stone and roofed with slate; attached to each are orchards and gardens, and the whole face of the district presents an appearance of improvement. Lord Headley has a pattern farm of considerable extent adjoining his demesne, and has erected a splendid villa in the Italian style of architecture, commanding an interesting and extensive view over the great Lower Lake of Killarney; the approach is by a small but elegant bridge across a ravine, leading from the entrance gate and lodge, which are both in a corresponding style of architecture. The plantations of Aghadoe House comprise about 100 acres, extending along the hill overlooking the lake. [For Lord Headley's other improvements see the articles on Castleisland and Glanbegh.] Grena, the seat of John O'Connell, Esq., is pleasantly situated on the river Laune, near its outlet from the lake: this river is considered capable of being made navigable from Castle-maine bay to the lake. The other seats are Lakeville, the residence of James O'Connell, Esq., so called from its proximity to the Lower Lake; Fossa Cottage, of W. B. Harding, Lord Headley's agent; Lakelands, at present unoccupied; Gurtroe, of S. Riordan, Esq.; Prospect Hall, of the Hon. T. Browne, brother of the Earl of Kenmare, commanding a fine view of the lake and its numerous islands; and, on the opposite side of the lake, Tomies, the seat of D. J. O'Sullivan, Esq. Near the town of Killarney, but within the limits of this parish, are the extensive flour-mills of Messrs. Galway and Leahy, worked by the small river Dinagh. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Ardfert and Aghadoe, forming the corps of the archdeaconry of Aghadoe, in the patronage of the Bishop, and partly impropriate in the Earl of Donoughmore and H. Herbert, Esq., of Muckross. The tithes, including those of "the five plough-lands of Killarney," amount to £552. 4. 7 1/2., of which £447. 4. 7 1/2. is payable to the archdeacon, and of the remainder, £55 is payable to the lessee of Lord Donoughmore, and £50 to H. Herbert, Esq., as abbot of Innisfallen. A glebe of 10 3/4 acres, and one-third of the tithes of the "Church Quarter" in the parish of Kilgarvan, with tithes in Tuosist amounting to £15. 6. 11 1/2. late currency, belong also to the archdeacon. There is at present neither church nor glebe-house: the ancient and much used burial-ground adjoining the ruins of the cathedral of Aghadoe has been enlarged by the addition of a slip of ground given by Lord Headley. It is in contemplation to erect a church on a site to the west of the ancient cathedral, presented by Lord Headley, who has also contributed £100 towards a subscription now in progress for this purpose, and at present amounting to about £700, to which the archdeacon, who has appointed a curate, subscribed £100, and the Countess of Rosse, £50. In the R. C. divisions this parish forms part of the unions or districts of Killarney, Killorglin, and Glenflesk; the chapel for the portion of the parish in the district of Killarney is at Fossa, to the north of the lake, adjoining the plantations of Lord Headley; and at Barraduff is also a chapel for that part of the parish which is in the district of Glenflesk. In that part of the town of Killarney which is within this parish is a convent for nuns of the order of the Presentation, in which is a school of nearly 400 girls, who are gratuitously instructed by the ladies of the convent, and to the support of which the Earl of Kenmare contributes £100 per annum. There is also a school supported partly by an annual donation of £5 from his lordship, and by subscription. The venerable remains of the ancient cathedral are situated on the summit of a range of low hills, sloping gradually towards the northern shore of the great Lower Lake. Near them are the ruins of an ancient round tower, of which about 20 feet are yet standing; and at a short distance are those of an ancient castle, usually called "the Pulpit."

AGHADOWN.-- See AUGHADOWN.

AGHADOWY, or AGHADOEY, a parish, in the half-barony of COLERAINE, county of LONDONDERRY, and province of ULSTER, 6 miles (S. by W.) from Coleraine, on the road from that place to Dungannon; containing 7634 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the north-east by the river Bann, is 10 3/4 miles in length from north-west to south-east; and 4 1/2 miles in breadth from north-east to south-west; and, with the extra-parochial grange or liberty of Agivey, which is locally within its limits, and has since the Reformation been attached to it, comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 18,115 3/4 statute acres, of which 1727 3/4 are in Agivey, 119 1/2 are covered with water, and 16,290 are applotted under the tithe act. Its western extremity is mountainous and barren, but eastward towards the river the soil is fertile; the lands are generally in a high state of cultivation, particularly in the neighbourhood of Keeley, Ballybrittan, Rushbrook, Flowerfield, and Mullamore; in the valley where the Agivey and Aghadowy waters meet, the soil is very rich. Previously to the year 1828, no wheat was grown in this parish; but since that period the system of agriculture has been greatly improved, and, in 1832, Mr. James Hernphill introduced the cultivation of mangel-wurzel and turnips, which has been attended with complete success. There are considerable tracts of bog, but they will soon be exhausted by the large quantities annually consumed in the bleach-greens; and in the western or mountainous parts are large tracts of land which, from the depth of the soil, might easily be brought into cultivation. Ironstone is found in several parts, but is more particularly plentiful in the townland of Bovagh. The greater portion of the parish formed part of the lands granted, in 1609, by Jas. I. to the Irish Society, and is now held under the Ironmongers' Company, of London, by whom, on the expiration of the present leases, the lands will be let, as far as may be practicable, on the English principle: the Mercers' Company, the Bishop of Derry, and the Rev. T. Richardson are also proprietors. There are numerous gentlemen's seats, of which the principal are Rushbrook, the residence of J. Knox, Esq.; Landmore, of Geo. Dunbar, Esq.; Flowerfield, of J. Hunter, Esq.; Flowerfield, of Mrs. Hemphill; Keeley, of Andrew Orr, Esq.; Ballydivitt, of T. Bennett, Esq.; Mullamore, of A. Barklie, Esq.; Moneycarrie, of J. McCleery, Esq.; Meath Park, of J. Wilson, Esq.; Bovagh, of R. Hezlett, Esq.; and Killeague, of Mrs. Wilson. Previously to 1730 the parish was for the greater part unenclosed and uncultivated; but three streams of water which intersect it attracted the attention of some spirited individuals engaged in the linen trade, which at that time was coming into notice, and had obtained the sanction of some legislative enactments for its encouragement and support. Of these, the first that settled here with a view to the introduction of that trade were Mr. J. Orr, of Ballybrittan, and Mr. J. Blair of Ballydivitt, who, in 1744, established some bleach-greens; since that time the number has greatly increased, and there are at present not less than eleven in the parish, of which ten are in full operation. The quantity of linen bleached and finished here, in 1833, amounted to 126,000 pieces, almost exclusively for the English market; they are chiefly purchased in the brown state in the markets of Coleraine, Ballymoney, Strabane, and Londonderry, and are generally known in England as "Coleraines," by which name all linens of a similar kind, wherever made, are now called, from the early celebrity which that town acquired for linens of a certain width and quality. In addition to the bleaching and finishing, Messrs. A. and G. Barklie have recently introduced the manufacture of linens, and have already 800 looms employed. Coarse kinds of earthenware, bricks, and water pipes, are manufactured in considerable quantities; and when the navigation of the river Bann is opened, there is every probability that this place will increase in importance. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Derry, constituting the corps of the prebend of Aghadowy in the cathedral church of that see, and in the patronage of the Bishop: the tithes amount to £500. The church, situated in a fertile vale near the centre of the parish, and rebuilt in 1797, is a small neat edifice with a handsome tower, formerly surmounted by a lofty octagonal spire, erected at the expense of the late Earl of Bristol (when bishop of Derry), but which was destroyed by lightning in 1826; the tower, being but slightly injured, was afterwards embattled and crowned with pinnacles: the Ecclesiastical Commissioners have lately granted £183 for the repair of the church. The late Board of First Fruits granted £100 towards the erection of a glebe-house, in 1789; and in 1794 the present house, called Blackheath, was built by the late Sir Harvey Brace, Bart., as a glebe-house for the parish. It is a handsome residence; over the mantel-piece in the drawing-room is an elegant sculpture, representing Socrates discovering his pupil Alcibiades in the haunts of dissipation, which was brought from Italy by Lord Bristol, and presented to Sir H. Bruce. The glebe lands comprise 403 statute acres, exclusively of a glebe of 121 acres in Agivey; and the gross value of the prebend, as returned by His Majesty's Commissioners on Ecclesiastical Revenues, is £880 per annum. In the R. C. divisions this parish forms part of the union or district of Killowen, or Coleraine, and contains a small chapel at Mullaghinch. There are places of worship for Presbyterians of the Synod of Ulster (of the first class), Seceders in connection with the Associate Synod (of the second class), and Covenanters, situated respectively at Aghadowy, Ringsend, Ballylintagh, and Killeague. There are five schools, situated respectively at Mullaghinch, Droghead, Collins, Drumstaple, and Killeague, supported by the Ironmongers' Company; two free schools at Gorran and Callyrammer, and two schools situated at Blackheath and Ballynakelly, of which the former, for females only, is supported by the rector's lady, and the latter is aided by an annual donation from Mr. Knox. About 530 boys and 350 girls are taught in these schools; and there is a private school of about 16 boys and 20 girls. A religious establishment was founded here, in the 7th century, by St. Goarcus, as a cell to the priory or abbey founded by him at Agivey, the latter of which became a grange to the abbey of St. Mary-de-la-Fouta, or Mecasquin, in 1172. A very splendid lachrymatory or double patera of pure gold, of exquisite workmanship and in good preservation, was found at Mullaghinch in 1832, and is now in the possession of Alexander Barklie, Esq. In the townland of Crevilla is a large druidical altar, called by the country people the "Grey Stane;" and on the mountains above Rushbrook is a copious chalybeate spring, powerfully impregnated with iron and sulphur held in solution by carbonic acid gas.

 

AGHAGOWER.-- See AUGHAGOWER.

AGHALEE, or AGHANALEE, a parish, in the Upper half-barony of MASSAREENE, county of ANTRIM, and province of ULSTER, 1 mile (N. by W.) from Moira, on the road from that place to Antrim; containing 1411 inhabitants. This place obtained the name of Soldiers'-town from its having had, during the war in 1641, a barrack in the village, in which were quartered two troops of horse and foot belonging to the royal army. The parish is bounded on the west by Lough Neagh, and comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 2499 1/2 statute acres: the land is fertile and in a very high state of cultivation; there is neither bog nor waste land. Limestone abounds, and great quantities are shipped off by the Lagan canal from Lough Neagh to Belfast. Broommount House is the property and residence of Stafford Gorman, Esq. Many of the working class are employed at their own houses in weaving linen and cotton for the manufacturers of Belfast. The parish is in the diocese of Dromore; the rectory is impropriate in the Marquess of Hertford; the vicarage forms part of the union of Magheramesk. The tithes amount to £100. 16., of which £21. 16. is payable to the impropriator, and the remainder to the vicar. The church of the union, situated here, is a small plain edifice in substantial repair. The glebe-house, about half a mile from the church, was built in 1826; and the glebe contains 13a., 3r., 9p., valued at £12. 8. 6. per annum. In the R. C. divisions it forms part of the union or district of Aghagallen, or Ballinderry. The parochial school, near the church, is principally supported by the vicar; and there are two other public and two private schools. A finely wrought and flexible piece of gold, shaped like a gorget, was found near this place a few years since.

AGHALOO.-- See AUGHALOO.

AGHAMACART.-- See AUGHAMACART.

AGHAMORE.-- See AGHAVOWER.

AGHANAGH.-- See AUGHANAGH.

AGHANCON, a parish, partly in the barony of CLONLISK, but chiefly in that of BALLYBRITt, KING'S county, and province of LEINSTER, 3 1/2 miles (N.) from Roscrea, on the road from Parsonstown to Mountrath; containing 1378 inhabitants. It comprises 3000 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act: the land is mostly poor, and the state of agriculture is not much improved; there is some bog, and gritstone used for building is found. The principal seats are Leap Castle, the residence of H. Darby, Esq.; and Summer Hill, of F. Freeman, Esq. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Killaloe, and in the patronage of the Bishop: the tithes amount to £150. The church is a neat edifice in good repair: it was built in 1786, at the joint expense of Dr. Pery, then Bishop of Limerick, and Jonathan Darby, Esq., with the aid of a gift of £390 from the late Board of First Fruits. The glebe-house was built by the late incumbent, and has been much improved and enlarged at the expense of the Rev. R. M. Kennedy, the present incumbent; the glebe comprises 15 acres. The parochial school, in which 22 boys and 17 girls are at present taught, is supported by Mr. Darby; the school-house is a good slated building near the church. There are also two private pay schools, in which are about 50 boys and 30 girls. The ruins of Ballybrit castle yet exist; and on the townland of Garryhill is a mineral spring.

AGHANLOO, or AGHANLOE, a parish, in the barony of KENAUGHt, county of LONDONDERRY, and province of ULSTER, 2 miles (N.) from NewtownLimavady; containing 2159 inhabitants. It comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 82511 statute acres, of which 50 3/4 acres are under water. On the plantation of Ulster in the reign of Jas. I., the lands of this parish and several others were allotted to the Haberdashers' Company, of London, who selected this as the head of their territory, and built a bawn and castle for its defence, in 1619, which was called Bally Castle, or "the Castle of the Town," and placed under the custody of Sir Robt. McLellan, who had a garrison of 80 able men and arms for its protection. In the war of 1641 the castle was besieged by the insurgents, headed by Capt. O. Hagan, but was bravely defended by Capt. Philips, its governor, till May in the following year, when it was relieved by the united Derry and Strabane troops, under the command of Col. Mervyn, and the assailants put to flight; but in the contentions which afterwards ensued it was destroyed, and has ever since been in ruins. The lands are of variable quality; in the district bordering on the Roe the soil is fertile, being principally composed of gravel, with a mixture of clay, and produces abundant crops of wheat, oats, &c.; towards the mountains it is a stiff marl, with a substratum of white limestone, and produces excellent crops of flax and oats. The mountain of Benyevenagh, consisting entirely of basalt, and rising to the height of 1260 feet above the level of Lough Foyle, which washes its base, affords excellent pasturage, and is cultivated on the western side nearly to its summit. Limestone abounds, and is found ranging immediately under the basalt throughout the whole length of the parish. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Deny, and in the patronage of the Bishop: the tithes amount to £315. The church, a small neat edifice in the early English style, was erected in 1836, by aid of a grant from the late Board of First Fruits; it has a lofty square tower crowned with pinnacles, and is situated about a quarter of a mile to the south of the ruins of the old church. Divine service is also performed in two school-houses, in distant parts of the parish, alternately once every Sunday, in summer, and twice in winter. The glebe-house, nearly adjoining the church, is a handsome residence; the glebe comprises 32a. 1r. 19p. of excellent land. In the R. C. divisions the parish is included partly in the union or district of Magilligan, and partly in that of Newtown-Limavady. There are schools at Lisnagrib, Stradragh, and Ballycarton, in which are about 140 boys and 90 girls; and there is also a private school of about 11 boys and 7 girls. The parochial school, supported by the rector, is at present discontinued, in consequence of the erection of a new school-house now in progress at the expense of the Marquess of Waterford. A portion of the south wall of the old church is still remaining; it was destroyed by the insurgents in 1641, and was rebuilt from the produce of forfeited impropriations, by order of Wm. III. The Rev. G. V. Sampson, author of a "Map and Memoir of the County of Derry," was rector of this parish, and his statistical survey is dated from the glebe of Aghanloo.

AGHARNEY.-- See AHARNEY.

AGHAVALLIN, or AGHAVALAH, a parish, in the barony of IRAGHTICONNOR, county of KERRY, and province of MUNSTER, 4 1/2 miles (W. S. W.) from Tarbert; island containing, with the town of Ballylongford and the of Carrigue, 5688 inhabitants. This place anciently belonged to the O'Connors of Kerry, whose principal seat, Castle Carrig-a-foile, signifying in the Irish language "the rock of the chasm," was situated on the south-west side of the inlet between the main land and the small island of Carrigue, which is encircled by the river Shannon. This castle was defended on the land side by a double wall flanked with circular and square bastions, which are still remaining, and was fortified against Queen Elizabeth by O'Connor, who placed in it a garrison under the command of Julio, an Italian officer. The castle, with the entire barony, excepting only one estate, was forfeited by the O'Connors of Kerry, in 1666, and conferred by the act of settlement upon the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin. The parish is situated on the river Shannon, and within a mile and a half of the high road from Tralee to Limerick, and comprises 15,152 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act. About one-third of it is good arable land, rather more than one-third of a coarser quality, and the remainder is mountain pasture and bog. Limestone for manure is brought from Askeaton by turf boats returning from Limerick; and sea manure is also extensively used. A species of brown stone of good quality is quarried for building. The principal seats are Kiletton, the residence of W. Hickey, Esq.; Litter, of G. Wren, Esq.; Rusheen, of F. Crosbie, Esq.; Rushy Park, the property of Godfrey Leonard, Esq., at present occupied by Terence O'Connor, Esq.; Ahanogran, the seat of J. O'Connor, Esq.; and Asdee, of Barry Collins, Esq. A steam-boat passes daily from Kilrush to Tarbert and Limerick, and vessels of 30 tons enter the creek for potatoes and turf, in which a considerable traffic is carried on. Dredging for oysters off the island of Carrigue, and fishing, employ several persons in the season. The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Ardfert and Aghadoe, to which those of Liseltin, Killehenny, Galey, Murhir, Kilnaughten, Disert, Finuge, Listowel, and Knockanure are united, constituting the union of Aghavallin, in the patronage of Anthony Stoughton, Esq., in whom the rectory is impropriate. The tithes amount to £304. 12. 2., of which £152. 6. 1. is payable to the impropriator, and the remainder to the vicar: the gross amount of tithes of the union payable to the incumbent is £774. 17. 11. The church, having been condemned, is about to be rebuilt by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. There are churches at Liseltin, Kilnaughten, and Listowel. There are several glebes in the union, but all in the possession of the impropriator. In the R. C. divisions this parish is the head of the union or district of Ballylongford, also called Tarbert, which comprises the parishes of Aghavallin and Kilnaughten: a chapel has been recently erected at Asdee, as a chapel of ease to that at Ballylongford; and there is also a chapel at Tarbert, in the parish of Kilnaughten. A large and commodious school-house has been erected at Ballylongford: but the Protestant children of the parish attend a school at Sallow Glin, the demesne of Mr. Sandes, on the border of the adjoining parish; there are six pay schools.-- See BALLYLONGFORD and CARRIGUE.

AGHAVOWER, or AGHAMORE, a parish, in the barony of COSTELLO, county of MAYO, and province of Connaught, 4 1/2 miles (N.) from Ballyhaunis, on the road from that place to Swinford; containing 7062 inhabitants. St. Patrick is said to have erected a monastery here, for his disciple St. Loarn. The surface of the parish is varied with several small lakes; the lands are chiefly under tillage; there is a considerable quantity of bog, also a quarry of black marble. The gentlemen's seats are Cooge, the residence of James Dillon, Esq.; Annach, of Thomas Tyrrell, Esq.; and Oahil, of James McDonnell, Esq. Fairs are held at Ballinacostello on June 3rd, Aug. 8th, Oct. 19th, and Dec. 18th. The parish is in the diocese of Tuam, and is a rectory and vicarage, forming part of the union of Kiltullagh: the tithes amount to £158. 4. 10. The ancient church is in ruins, but the cemetery is still used. In the R. C. divisions it is part of the district of Knock; the chapel is an old thatched building. There are seven pay schools, in which are about 550 children. At Cloonfallagh there is a mineral spring.

AGHER, a parish, in the barony of UPPER DEECE, county of MEATH, and province of LEINSTER, 2 1/2 miles (S. S. W.) from Summerhill; containing 360 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Summerhill to Edenderry, and from the latter town to Dunboyne, and contains 1900 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act. Its surface gently undulates, and the soil consists of loam of different qualities: about one-third of the land is under tillage, and the remainder, with the exception of about 100 acres of bog, half of which is cut away and partly planted, is good grazing land. There are quarries of limestone; the Royal Canal passes near the southern extremity of the parish. Agher House, the residence of J. P. Winter, Esq., occupies a beautiful situation in a demesne of about 650 statute acres, containing some fine timber: the gardens are extensive and well laid out; and the neat appearance of the cottages on the estate manifests the proprietor's regard for the comforts of the peasantry. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Meath, and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes amount to £80. The church is a neat edifice, erected by voluntary contributions and a parochial rate, in 1804: it contains a window painted by Gervaise, representing Paul preaching at Athens, from the cartoons of Raphael, which was formerly in the private chapel at Dangan, in the adjoining parish, when that place was the seat of the Wellesley family. There is a glebe-house, with a glebe of 12 1/2 acres. In the R. C. divisions this parish forms part of the union or district of Laracor, or Summerhill: the chapel is situated on the townland of Agher, on ground given by the family of Winter. The parochial school for both sexes is aided by annual donations from Mr. Winter and the rector, and there is a private pay school; also a dispensary.

 

AGHERTON, or BALLYAGHRAN, a parish, in the liberties of COLERAINE, county of LONDONDERRY, and province of ULSTER, 3 miles (N. N. W.) from Coleraine; containing, with the town of Portstewart, 2746 inhabitants. This parish occupies the whole of the promontory between the Bann and the Atlantic, comprising, according to the Ordnance survey, 3896 3/4 statute acres, of which 3709 are applotted under the tithe act, and valued at £2831 per annum. With the exception of about 330 acres, the whole is arable; there is a small portion of unenclosed land, part of which is light and sandy, and chiefly a rabbit warren, and part affords excellent pasture. The cultivation of wheat was introduced by Mr. Orr, in 1829, and great quantities are now annually raised. Similar success attended the cultivation of barley, potatoes, mangel-wurzel, and turnips; and the agriculture of the parish is at present in a very flourishing state. Iron-ore is found in great quantities, and might be worked to great advantage, but no works have yet been established. There are several gentlemen's seats, the principal of which are Cromore, an elegant, mansion, the residence of J. Cromie, Esq., the principal proprietor in the parish, who has recently planted several acres with forest and other trees; Flowerfield, of S. Orr, Esq.; O'Hara Castle, of H. O'Hara, Esq.; Low Rock, of Miss McManus; and Black Rock, of T. Bennett, Esq. There are also several villas and handsome bathing lodges at Portstewart, a pleasant and well-attended watering-place. A small manufacture of linen and linen yarn is carried on, and many of the inhabitants are employed in the fisheries, particularly in the salmon fishery on the river Bann. Of late, great quantities of salmon have been taken along the whole coast, by means of a newly invented net; and the sea fishery is continued for a long time after that on the river is by law compelled to cease. The Bann, which is the only outlet from Lough Neagh, discharges itself into the Atlantic at the western point of the parish; it appears to have changed its course, and now passes close under the point of Down Hill, the celebrated mansion erected by the Earl of Bristol, when Bishop of Derry. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Connor, united by charter of Jas. I., in 1609, to the rectory of Ardclinis, together constituting the union of Agherton, and the corps of the treasurership in the cathedral church of St. Saviour, Connor, in the patronage of the Bishop. The tithes amount to £240; and the tithes of the union, including glebe, amount to £470, constituting the gross income of the treasurership, to which no duty is annexed. The church, a small edifice, was erected in 1836, at an expense of £960, of which £100 was raised by subscription, £800 was a loan from the late Board of First Fruits, and £60 was given by John Cromie, Esq., who also paid the interest on £700 of the loan until the debt was cancelled in 1833. Divine service is also performed by the curate every Sunday in the school-house at Portstewart. The glebe-house, a handsome residence close adjoining the church, was built in 1806, for which the Board granted a gift of £250 and a loan of £500; the glebe comprises 20 acres of profitable land, valued at £80 per annum. In the R. C. divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Coleraine. There are places of worship for Presbyterians and Wesleyan Methodists, the former in connection with the Synod of Ulster and of the third class. There is a male free school, and a female and two infants' schools are supported by Mrs. Cromie, who has built a large school-room for one of the latter: 275 children are taught in these schools; and there are four private schools, in which are about 130 children, and four Sunday schools. Mark Kerr O'Neill, Esq., in 1814, bequeathed £40 per ann. to the poor. There are some remains of the ancient castle of Mac Quillan on the glebe land adjoining the church. Near them are the gabled walls of the old church, still tolerably entire; and in the adjoining field is an extensive cave formed of uncemented walls covered with large flat stones, one of the largest and most perfect yet known in this part of the country: there are also several other caves in the parish. In the townland of Carnanee is a very fine triangular fort, called Craig-an-Ariff; it is defended by fosses and breastworks, and is the only fort so constructed in this part of Ireland; within the enclosure are two cairns or tumuli. Dr. Adam Clarke, whose father kept a school for several years in the old parish church, received the rudiments of his education here; and in the latter part of his life spent much of his time in the summer at Portstewart, where during his stay in 1830, he built a handsome house, and erected in the gardens of Mr. Cromie a curious astronomical and geographical dial, which is still preserved there.-- See PORTSTEWART.

AGHIARt, a parish, in the barony of KILLIAN, county of GALWAY, and province of Connaught, 12 miles (E. S. E.) from Tuam, on the road from that place to Ballinasloe; the population is returned with the parish of Ballinakilly. It comprises 3203 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act: the soil is fertile, the land generally in a good state of cultivation, and the bogs are all reclaimable. Mount Bellew is the seat of M. D. Bellew, Esq., and Bellew's Grove, of Mrs. Bellew. The parish is in the diocese of Tuam, and is a rectory and vicarage, forming part of the union of Moylough: the tithes, which also include those of Ballinakilly, amount to £148. 10. 8 1/4. In the R. C. divisions it is the head of a union or district, also called the union of Mount Bellew, which comprises the parishes of Aghiart, Killascobe, and Moylough, and contains three chapels, situated respectively at Mount Bellew, Menlo, and Moylough; the first is a handsome slated edifice, erected at the sole expense of C. D. Bellew, Esq.

AGHNAMADLE, a parish, in the barony of UPPER ORMOND, county of TIPPERARY, and province of MUNSTER, 85 miles (S.) from Moneygall, on the mail coach road from Limerick to Dublin; containing, with the town of Toomavara, 3577 inhabitants. This place was formerly the residence of the O'Egan family, and there are still considerable portions of the old Court of Aghnamadle remaining. The parish, which is bounded on the east by King's county, comprises 6076 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Killaloe, and in the patronage of the Bishop: the tithes amount to £369. 4. 7 1/2. The church is a small edifice, situated at Toomavara. There is neither glebe nor glebe-house. In the R. C. divisions it is the head of a union or district, which comprises also the parish of Ballymackey, and is called the union of Toomavara, in which are two chapels, one at Toomavara, a large building, and one at Ballymackey. About 120 boys and 120 girls are taught in two public schools; and there are also three private schools, in which are about 170 children. A poor fund has been established here on Dr. Chalmers' plan. There are remains of Blane castle, and of the old church, near which is an oratory apparently of great antiquity; and at Ballinlough is a chalybeate spring.-- See TOOMAVARA.

AGHNAMOLT.-- See ANNAMULT.

AGHNAMULLEN.-- See AUGHNAMULLEN.

AGHOLD, or AGH-UAILL, a parish, in the half-barony of SHILLELAGH, county of WICKLOW, and province of LEINSTER, 5 miles (E. by S.) from Tullow; containing 2977 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the south-western boundary of the county, comprises 7978 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act. The state of agriculture is improving; there is a considerable quantity of mountain land and bog. The gentlemen's seats are Munny, the residence of Capt. A. A. Nickson; the Hall, of A. Haskins, Esq.; and Killenure, of A. Muntford, Esq. A constabulary police station has been established here; and petty sessions are held at Coolkenno every alternate Monday. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Leighlin, constituting the corps of the prebend of Aghold in the cathedral church of St. Lazerian, Leighlin, and episcopally united, in 1714, to the impropriate curacies of Mullinacuff, Crecrim, and Liscoleman, which four parishes form the union of Aghold, in the patronage of the Bishop. The tithes amount to £464. 3. 3 3/4.; and the gross tithes of the union, payable to the incumbent, amount to £674. 9. 9 1/4. The church was erected in 1716, and enlarged by aid of a loan of £350 from the late Board of First Fruits, in 1814. The glebe-house was built by a gift of £100 and a loan of £1350 from the same Board; the glebe comprises 10 acres. In the R. C. divisions this parish is included in the union or district of Clonmore; the chapel is at Kilquigan. There are five schools, of which the parochial school is under the Trustees of Erasmus Smith's Charity, and another is aided by the Governors of the Foundling Hospital, and in which about 160 boys and 120 girls are taught.

AGHOUR.-- See FRESHFORD. AGHRIM.-- See RATHDRUM. AGHULTIE.-- See BALLYHOOLEY.

AGIVEY, a grange, or extra parochial district, locally in the parish of AGHADOWY, half-barony of COLERAINE, county of LONDONDERRY, and province of ULSTER, 6 miles (S. S. E.) from Coleraine; containing 938 inhabitants. This place appears to have been the site of a religious establishment, by some called a priory and by others an abbey, the foundation of which, about the beginning of the seventh century, is attributed to St. Goarcus, who afterwards founded a cell at Agha-Dubthaigh, now Aghadowy. This establishment subsequently became dependent on the abbey of St. Mary-de-la-Fonta, or Mecasquin, which was founded in the year 1172, and to which this district became a grange. There are still some slight remains of the ancient religious house, with an extensive cemetery, in which are some tombs of the ancient family of the Cannings, ancestors of the present Lord Garvagh. The liberty is situated on the western bank of the river Bann, and on the road from Newtown-Limavady to Ballymoney, which is continued over the river by a light and handsome bridge of wood, of 6 arches 203 feet in span, erected in 1834 at the joint expense of the counties of Londonderry and Antrim. It comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 1727 3/4 statute acres, the whole of which is free from tithe or parochial assessment, and forms part of the estates of the Ironmongers' Company, of London. The land is fertile, but being divided into small holdings in the occupation of tenants without capital to expend on its improvement, has been greatly neglected, and no regular system of agriculture has been adopted; there is a small tract of bog, which is now nearly worked out for fuel. Potters' clay of good quality is found here in great abundance; and a considerable manufacture of coarse earthenware, bricks, and water pipes is carried on for the supply of the neighbourhood. Iron-stone is found near the Aghadowy water, and there are also some indications of coal. A fair is held on Nov. 12th, under a charter granted to the monks of Coleraine at a very early period, and is chiefly for the sale of cattle and pigs. There is neither church nor any place of worship in the district; the inhabitants attend divine service at the several places of worship in Aghadowy.

d 20 girls. Immediately adjoining the church are the remains of the ancient structure, completely mantled with ivy, and forming an interesting appendage.

AGLISH, or AGLISHMARTIN, a parish, in the barony of IVERK, county of KILKENNY, and province of LEINSTER, 3 miles (W.) from Waterford, on the river Suir, and on the road from Waterford to Carrick-on-Suir; containing 401 inhabitants, of which number, 142 are in the village. It comprises 2414 statute acres, and is a rectory, in the diocese of Ossory, and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes amount to £96. 18. 5 1/2. There is neither church nor glebe-house; the glebe consists of 2 1/2 acres. In the R. C. divisions it is part of the union or district of Moncoin.

AGLISH, county of MAYO.-- See CASTLEBAR.

AGLISH, a parish, in the barony of DECIES-within-DRUM, county of WATERFORD, and province of MUNSTER, 8 miles (W.) from Dungarvan; containing 3689 inhabitants, of which number, 302 are in the village. This parish is situated on the river Blackwater, by which it is bounded on the west, and comprises about 7800 statute acres of arable, pasture, and meadow land, 810 of woodland, 1393 of waste, and 1296 of bog and marsh, the greater portion of which affords good pasturage for cattle: of its entire extent, 6706 acres are applotted under the tithe act. Part of it is mountainous, but towards the river the soil is generally fertile. It is in the diocese of Lismore, and is a vicarage, forming part of the union of Affane; the rectory is impropriate in the Duke of Devonshire. The tithes amount to £480, of which £320 is payable to the irnpropriator, and the remainder to the vicar. There is a chapel at Villierstown independent of the vicarage, founded and endowed by John, Earl of Grandison; the living is a donative, in the patronage of H. V. Stuart, Esq. In the R. C. divisions the parish is the head of a union or district, which comprises also the parish of Whitechurch and part of the parish of Ardmore, and contains three chapels, situated respectively at Aglish, Ballynamileach, and Slievegrine also a friary chapel. There are two schools, supported by H. V. Stuart, Esq., in which 183 children are instructed; and five pay schools, in which are about 220 boys and 85 girls.

AGLISHCLOGHANE, or EGLISH, a parish, in the barony of LOWER ORMOND, county of TIPPERARY, and province of MUNSTER, 3 miles (N. E.) from Burris-o-kane, on the road from Roscrea to Portumna; containing 1961 inhabitants. It comprises 4474 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act. The system of agriculture is improving, and a considerable portion of moor land, formerly waste, has been reclaimed and brought into cultivation: there is an abundance of bog. Limestone of superior quality abounds, and is quarried for building. Milford, pleasantly situated in a well-planted demesne, is the occasional residence of Ralph Smith, Esq. The living consists of a rectory, vicarage, and perpetual curacy, in the diocese of Killaloe; the vicarage, with cure of souls, forms the corps of the archdeaconry of Killaloe, with which are held, without cure, the rectories of Aglishcloghane, Lorrha, and Dorrha, episcopally united in 1785, and by act of council in 1802, and in the patronage of the Bishop; the perpetual curacy is in the patronage of the Archdeacon. The tithes amount to £161. 10. 9 1/4., and of the entire union, to £1013. 7. 8 3/4. The church of the union is at Lorrha, where is also the glebe-house of the archdeaconry; and there are two glebes, comprising together about 43 acres, situated respectively near the sites of the old churches. The church of the perpetual curacy, a neat modern building, for the erection of which the late Board of First Fruits gave £800, in 1813, is situated near the ruins of the old church, in the churchyard of which is a very old ash tree of large dimensions. The glebe-house was built by aid of a gift of £450 and a loan of £50 from the same Board, in 1816; the glebe comprises 13 1/2 acres; and the stipend of the perpetual curate is £100 per ann., paid by the archdeacon. This is one of the three parishes which constitute the R. C. union or district of Burris o-kane: the chapel is situated in the village of Eglish. The parochial school is supported under the patronage of the perpetual curate; and there is also a school in the R. C. chapel.

AGLISHCORMICK, or LISCORMUCK, a parish, partly in the barony of COONAGH, but principally in that of CLANWILLIAM, county of LIMERICK, and province of MUNSTER, 2 1/2 miles (W. S. W.) from Pallas-Greine, on the road to Bruff; containing 316 inhabitants. It comprises 1020 1/4 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act: the land is in general of good quality. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Emly, and forms part of the corps of the precentorship in the cathedral church of St. Alibeus, Emly, in the patronage of the Archbishop of Cashel. The tithes amount to £138. 9. 2 3/4.: there is neither church, glebe-house, nor glebe. In the R. C. divisions the parish is included in the union or district of Kilteely, or Listeely. A school-house is now being erected; and there is a pay school of about 30 boys and 12 girls. There are some remains of the old parish church.

AGLISHDRINAGH, or AGLISHDRIDEEN, a parish, in the barony of ORRERY and KILMORE, county of CORK, and province of MUNSTER, 3 1/2 miles (S. W. by W.) from Charleville, on the road from that place to Buttevant; containing 973 inhabitants. It comprises 4770 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act, and valued at £4228 per ann.: the land under tillage is in general of good quality, but a very large portion of the parish consists chiefly of hilly pasture. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Cloyne, and in the patronage of the Bishop: the tithes amount to £240. There is neither church, glebe-house, nor glebe. In the R. C. divisions this is one of the six parishes that constitute the union of Ballyhea, or Newtown. There are some vestiges of the ancient parish church.

AGLISHMARTIN. -- See AGLISH. AGLISHVENAN. -- See BALLYMACART.

 

AHAMPLISH, a parish, in the barony of LOWER CARBERY, county of SLIGO, and province of Connaught, 9 miles (N. N. W.) from Sligo; containing, with the villages of Ballintample and Grange, and the islands of Innismurray and Dernish (which are separately described), 7483 inhabitants. It is situated on the northwest coast, near the entrance to the bay of Sligo, and on the road from Sligo to Ballyshannon; and comprises 9286 statute acres, of which 6509 are applotted under the tithe act, and of which, also, 7311 are arable and pasture, and 1975 bog and waste. The surface is naked and unadorned, having only one small wood on the lands of Grellagh, near the river Bunduff, the estate of Viscount Palmerston, who is proprietor of the greater part of the parish. The mountain of Benbulbin extends in a direction from east to west, and separates this parish from Drumcliffe. The principal village is Grange, consisting of one street, in which are only four decent houses, and the rest are thatched cabins. Some improvement in the mode of tillage has taken place of late years, but the system of husbandry is comparatively still very deficient, and the farming implements are of a very inferior kind: limestone and turf are plentiful. A great extent of bog has been reclaimed by Lord Palmerston, who has also planted large scopes of sandy banks with bent. Considerable improvements at Mullaghmore have been made exclusively by the direction and at the expense of that nobleman, which are noticed under the head of that place. There is a salmon fishery in the river Bunduff; and at Mullaghmore several boats were formerly employed in taking turbot, cod, and other kinds of fish, which abound on this part of the coast. There are some corn-mills in the parish. The principal seats are Moneygold, the residence of J. Soden, Esq.; Streeda, of Booth Jones, Esq.; Grange, of the Rev. C. West, the incumbent; and Creenymore, of the Rev. J. McHugh, P.P. Seven fairs for live stock are held at Grange; and a fair on Feb. 1st is held at Cliffony, which has also a penny post from Sligo. Grange is both a coastguard and a constabulary police station. The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Elphin, and in the patronage of the Bishop; the rectory is impropriate in Lord Palmerston. The tithes amount to £221. 10. 9., divided in moieties between the impropriator and the incumbent. The church is a plain edifice, built in 1813, for which the late Board of First Fruits granted a loan of £700, and Lord Palmerston contributed £100: it contains a marble monument to the Soden family, with an inscription recording the death of James Soden, in 1705, at the age of 109 years: the Ecclesiastical Commissioners have lately granted £119 for its repair. There is neither glebe nor glebe-house. The R. C. parish is co-extensive with that of the Established Church: there are two chapels, situated at Grange and Cliffony, and built at the sole expense of Lord Palmerston. Three schools are supported principally by his lordship, each of which has a house and garden, and in which are 170 boys and more than 100 girls; and in other private schools are taught more than ] 00 boys and 60 girls.

AHARA, otherwise AUGHARA, a parish, in the barony of ABBEYSHRUEL, county of LONGFORD, and province of LEINSTER, 4 1/2 miles (N. E.) from Ballymahon, on the mail coach road from that place to Mullingar: the population is returned with Kilglass. It comprises 2277 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act: the land is principally under tillage, but there is a large tract of bog. Castle-Wilder is the residence of H. Pollock, Esq. Petty sessions are held at Castle-Wilder every alternate week. It is in the diocese of Ardagh, and is part of the union of Kilglass, to which the vicarage is attached; the rectory is impropriate in Col. Fox. The tithes amount to £108. 15. 4 1/4.., of which £37. 7. 8 1/4. is payable to the impropriator, and the remainder to the vicar: the glebe comprises 37 acres, valued at £59. 19. 2. per annum. In the R. C. divisions it is also united to Kilglass. There are five hedge schools, in which are 96 boys and 56 girls. The remains of the church are still visible at Ahara, and there are also ruins of the ancient castle of Ardandra.

AHARNEY, or AGHARNEY, also called LISDOWNEY, a parish, partly in the barony of UPPER OSSORY, QUEEN'S' county, but chiefly in that of GALMOY, county of KILKENNY, and in the province of LEINSTER, 3 miles (S. by E.) from Durrow, on the road to Kilkenny; containing 2156 inhabitants. It comprises 6809 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act, and valued at £4616 per ann., and is nearly equally divided between tillage and pasturage; there is plenty of limestone, used both for building and burning. At Ballyconra is an extensive flour-mill, capable of manufacturing 16,000 barrels of flour annually; and there is another at the bridge of Ballyragget, both carried on by John Mosse, Esq., Ballyconra, situated in a fine demesne on the banks of the Nore, is the ancient seat of the family of Butler, Earls of Kilkenny, and is the occasional residence of the Hon. Col. Pierce Butler. A manor court is held at Clontubrid once a month, the jurisdiction of which extends over part of this parish. The living consists of a rectory and a vicarage, in the diocese of Ossory, the former united to the rectory of Attanagh, and the latter forming part of the vicarial union of Attanagh: the tithes amount to £340, of which £226. 13. 4. is payable to the rector, and the remainder to the vicar. In the R. C. divisions this parish is the head of a district, called the union of Lisdowney, comprising the parishes of Aharney, Sheffin, Balleen, Coolcashin, and parts of Rathbeagh and Grange, and containing three chapels; that of Lisdowney, with a school-house attached, was built by subscription. About 100 boys and 100 girls are taught in the school, and about 80 boys and 40 girls in two pay schools; there is also a Sunday school. The parochial church is in ruins; on the demesne of Ballyconra, where is the burial-place of the family of Butler, are other remains; and on the opposite side of the river there is a Danish fort.

AHASCRAGH, a post-town and parish, partly in the baronies of KILCONNELL and KILLIAN, but chiefly in that of CLONMACNOON, county of GALWAY, and province of Connaught, 30 miles (E. N. E.) from Galway, and 78 miles (W.) from Dublin, on the road from Ballinasloe to Castlebar; containing 5205 inhabitants, of which number, 851 are in the town, which contains about 120 houses. It is situated in a fine corn country and there are some large oatmeal-mills. Fairs are held on Easter-Monday, Wednesday after Trinity, Aug. 25th, and Nov. 24th. Petty sessions are held fortnightly and here is a station of the constabulary police. The parish comprises 10,692 statute acres: there are quarries of excellent limestone, also a large tract of bog, which might be reclaimed. A branch of the Grand Canal approaches within six miles, and a drawback on the carriage of goods is allowed by the company. The principal seats are Castle Ffrench, the residence of Lord Ffrench; Weston, of the Very Rev. Jas. Mahon, Dean of Dromore; Crigane, of S. Masters, Esq.; and Castlegar, of Sir Ross Mahon, Bart. Part of the demesne of Clonbrock, the seat of Lord Clonbrock, is also within the parish. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Elphin, and in the alternate patronage of the Crown and the Bishop: the tithes amount to £323. 1. 6 1/2. The church is a neat building, erected at an expense of £1500. of which £1000 was granted on loan by the late Board of First Fruits, in 1814. The glebe-house was built in 1804, and the same Board gave £100 towards defraying the expense: the glebe comprises 24 acres. The R. C. parish is co-extensive with that of the Established Church: the chapel is a large building, with a burial-ground annexed. In addition to the parochial school, there is one for boys and girls, supported by Lord Clonbrock, by whom a few of the children are clothed; and a male and female school are also supported by Sir Ross Mahon. About 170 boys and 90 girls are instructed in these schools; and there are also five hedge schools, in which are about 200 boys and 70 girls.

AHINAGH, or AGHINAGH, a parish, in the barony of EAST MUSKERRY, county of CORK, and province of MUNSTER, 4 miles (S. E.) from Macroom; containing 2442 inhabitants. This parish, anciently called Omai, contains the village of Carrigadrohid, which has a penny post, and through which the mail coach from Cork to Tralee passes. It comprises 9080 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act, and valued at £5321 per annum: the land is generally good and is well sheltered, particularly towards its southern boundary; about four-fifths are under a good system of cultivation; the remainder is rough pasture and bog. There are stone quarries, which are worked only for building. The river Lee is crossed at the village of Carrigadrohid by an old bridge, built by order of Cromwell, which connects the parish with the pretty modern village of Killinardrish. The banks of the river are here adorned with several elegant houses. Oakgrove, the residence of John Bowen, Esq., is a handsome modern mansion, situated in a richly ornamented demesne containing some of the finest oaks in the county. Coolalta, the residence of W. Furlong, Esq., M. D., is a pretty villa in the midst of some picturesque ground tastefully planted; and contiguous to the church is the glebe-house, a handsome edifice, the residence of the Rev. S. Gerrard Fairtlough. Besides the oak woods of Oakgrove, there are flourishing plantations of young timber at Carrigadrohid and Umery, the former of which is very extensive. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Cloyne, and in the patronage of the Bishop: the tithes amount to £738. 3. 11. The church is a small plain edifice with a square tower, erected in 1791, for which the late Board of First Fruits gave £500. The glebe-house was built in 1814, by a gift of £100 and a loan of £1500 from the same Board: the glebe comprises 24 acres. In the R. C. divisions one-half of this parish is comprised within the union or district of Aghabologue, which has a chapel at Rusheen, and the other is united to Macroom, for which there is a chapel at Caum: it is also in contemplation to erect a third chapel, by subscription, on ground given by Mr. Bowen. The parochial school for boys and girls is supported by contributions from resident gentlemen, and a neat building has been erected as a school-house: there are also an infants' school, a Sunday school, and a private pay school. The principal remains of antiquity are the ruined castles of Carrigadrohid and Mashanaglass; the former, according to some writers, built by a branch of the Macarthy family, and by others ascribed to the family of O'Leary: it is a massive structure, situated on a rock in the river Lee, with some modern additions, including an entrance opened from the bridge. The owner of the lands of Carrigadrohid has a patent for a fair, which is now held in a field in the parish of Cannaway. The castle of Mashanaglass is a lofty square tower of gloomy aspect, built by the Mac Swineys. Smith, in his history of Cork, mentions a letter addressed by Jas. I. to the Lord-deputy Sydney, directing him to accept the surrender of the lands of Owen Mac Swiney, otherwise "Hoggy of Mashanaglass." A little to the north of this ruin is Glen Laum, "the crooked glen," now called Umery, through which the mail coach road is carried: it is enclosed by precipitous rocky heights covered with valuable plantations, the property of Sir Thomas Deane, Knt., of Dundanion Castle, near Cork. On the glebe are the remains of a cromlech; and several single stones, called "Gollanes," are standing in the parish. Raths or Danish forts are numerous, and there are several artificial caves.

AHOGHILL, a parish, partly in the barony of LOWER ANTRIM, partly in that of KILCONWAY, partly in that of UPPER TOOME, but chiefly in the barony of LOWER TOOME, county of ANTRIM, and province of ULSTER, 4 miles (E. S. E.) from Portglenone; containing 14,920 inhabitants, of which number, 421 are in the village. The district around this place appears, from the numerous remains of forts and the great number of tumuli and human bones found, to have been the scene of much early warfare. During the war of 1688, the ford of the river Bann at Portglenone was regarded as a very important pass between the counties of Antrim and Derry; and Sir I. Magill and Capt. Edmonston were, in 1689, despatched to defend it against the Irish army on their march towards the Bann, in order to enter the county of Derry. In 1760, when the French under Thurot made a descent on Carrickfergus, the inhabitants of this place rose in a body for the defence of the country: a well-appointed force marched to Belfast, numerous parties proceeded to Carrickfergus, while others patroled the country nightly, and these irregular levies had a powerful effect in repelling the invaders. About the year 1771) an organised system of outrage pervaded the whole of this parish, in common with other parts of the county: the persons who thus combined, called themselves "Steel Men," or "Hearts of Steel," and executed their revenge by houghing cattle and perpetrating other outrages; they attacked the house of Paul McLarnon, Esq., who, in defending himself, was shot. In 1778, a corps was raised by John Dickey, Esq., of Cullybackey, and called the Cullybackey Volunteers; a similar corps was embodied the following year by T. Hill, Esq., of Drumra, called the Portglenone Volunteers, to which was afterwards added a second corps by -- Simpson, Esq.; and a corps, called the Ahoghill Volunteers, was raised by Alexander McManus, of Mount Davies. The parish, anciently called Maghrahoghill, of which the derivation is unknown, is bounded by the river Bann, which flows out of Lough Neagh in a direction from south to north, and is intersected by the river Maine, which flows into that lough in a direction from north to south. It was formerly more extensive than at present, having included Portglenone, which, in 1825, was, together with 21 townlands, severed from it and formed into a distinct parish. According to the Ordnance survey, including Portglenone, it comprises 85,419 statute acres, of which 14,954 are applotted under the tithe act, and 145 3/4 are covered with water. The system of agriculture is in a very indifferent state; there is a considerable quantity of waste land, with some extensive bogs, which might be drained. The surface is hilly, and many of the eminences being planted, render the valley through which the Maine flows beautiful and interesting. The village is neatly built, and the neighbourhood, is enlivened with several gentlemen's seats. The castle of Galgorm, a seat of the Earl of Mountcashel, is a handsome square embattled edifice, erected in the 17th century by the celebrated Dr. Colville; the rooms are wainscoted with Irish oak from the woods of Largy and Grange. The other principal seats in the parish and neighbourhood are Mount Davies, the residence of Alex. McManus, Esq.; Low Park, of J. Dickey, Esq.; Ballybollan, the property of Ambrose O'Rourke, Esq.; Lisnafillen, of W. Gihon, Esq., of Ballymena; Fenaghy, the residence of S. Cuningham, Esq.; Leighnmore, the property of J. Dickey, Esq.; and Drumona, built by Alex. Brown, Esq. The linen trade appears to have been introduced here by the ancestor of John Dickey, Esq., of Low Park, and now in its several branches affords employment to the greater number of the inhabitants. There are several bleach-greens on the river Maine: and a good monthly market is held in the village, for the sale of linens, on the Friday before Ballymony market. Fairs for cattle and pigs are held on June 4th, Aug. 26th, Oct. 12th, and Dec. 5th. The manorial court of Fortescue, anciently Straboy, has jurisdiction extending to debts not exceeding £5 late currency; and the manorial court of Cashel is held monthly at Portglenone, for the recovery of debts to the same amount. Two courts leet are held annually; and petty sessions are held every alternate Friday. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Connor, and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes amount to £1015. 7. 8. The church is an ancient edifice; the walls have within the last few years been raised and covered with a new roof. The glebe-house was built by a gift of £100 and a loan of £1500 from the late Board of First Fruits, in 1815; the glebe comprises 138 1/2 acres. In the R. C. divisions this is the head of a union or district, comprising also Portglenone, and containing three chapels, one about half a mile from the village, another at Aughnahoy, and a third at Portglenone. There are places of worship for Presbyterians in connection with the Synod of Ulster at Ahoghill and Cullybackey, both of the third class: in the former are also two places of worship for Seceders of the Ahoghill Presbytery, each of the second class, and in the latter is one for Covenanters; there is also a place of worship for Independents, and a Moravian meeting-house at Gracehill. There are 15 schools in different parts of the parish, in which are about 400 boys and 330 girls; and there are also 12 private schools, in which are about 300 boys and 150 girls; and 16 Sunday schools. John Guy, in 1813, bequeathed £12 per ann. to the Moravian establishment, which sum is now, by the death of his adopted heir, augmented to £45 per annum. There are some remains of Rory Oge Mac Quillan's castle of Straboy, and some tumuli at Moyessit.

ALISH-- See RATHKYRAN. ALLEN, Isle of.-- See RATHERNON.

ALL SAINTS, a parish, in the barony of RAPHOE, county of DONEGAL, and province of ULSTER, 6 miles (W.) from Londonderry, on Lough Swilly, and on the road from Londonderry to Letterkenny; containing 4066 inhabitants. It consists of several townlands formerly in the parish of Taughboyne, from which they were separated and formed into a distinct parish, containing, according to the Ordnance survey, 9673 3/4 statute acres, of which 102 are covered with water. The land is generally good and in a profitable state of cultivation; the system of agriculture is improving; the bog affords a valuable supply of fuel, and there are some good quarries of stone for building. Castle Forward, the property of the Earl of Wicklow, is at present in the occupation of W. Marshall, Esq. A distillery and a brewery are carried on to some extent; and petty sessions are held on the first Friday in every month. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the diocese of Raphoe, and in the patronage of the Incumbent of Taughboyne. The church, a neat small edifice, was formerly a chapel of ease to the church of Taughboyne. In the R. C. divisions this parish is the head of a union or district, called the union of Lagan, and comprising also the parishes of Taughboyne, Killea, and Raymochy; there are three chapels, situated respectively at Newtown-Conyngham (in All Saints), Raymochy, and Taughboyne. There are two places of worship for Presbyterians, one in connection with the Synod of Ulster, of the third class; and the other with the Seceding Synod. The parochial school is aided from Robinson's fund; a school of 28 girls is supported by Lady Wicklow, and a school is supported by subscription; there are also three pay schools, in which are about 90 boys and 20 girls, and a Sunday school. The interest of £200, bequeathed by a respectable farmer, is annually divided among the poor.

ALL SAINTS, an island, in the parish of CASHEL, barony of RATHCLINE, county of LONGFORD, and province of LEINSTER; the population is returned with the parish. This island, which is situated in Lough Ree, comprises only 291 statute acres, divided into several small farms, and contains eight houses.-- See CASHEL.

ALMORITIA, or MORANSTOWN, a parish, in the barony of RATHCONRATH, county of WESTMEATH, and province of LEINSTER, 4 1/2 miles (N. E.) from Ballymore, on the road from Mullingar to Athlone; containing 675 inhabitants. This parish, which is also called Ballymoran, comprises 2330 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act, and is principally under an improving system of tillage: there is but an inconsiderable portion of bog; limestone of very good quality abounds, and is quarried chiefly for building. The Royal Canal passes within four miles of the parish, affording great advantages to this district, which is wholly agricultural. The principal seats are Glencarry, the residence of J. H. Kelly, Esq., surrounded with flourishing plantations; Darlington Lodge, of A. McDonnell, Esq.; and Halston, of H. Boyd Gamble, Esq. On a stream which runs from Ballinacurra lake, through the parish, into the river Inney, is a large flour-mill. The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Meath, to which that of Piercetown was united episcopally in 1791, and in the patronage of the Bishop: the tithes of the parish amount to £70, and of the entire benefice to £165. The church was rebuilt in 1816, for which the late Board of First Fruits granted a loan of £600, obtained by the bishop, through the representation of Mr. Kelly, of Glencarry. The glebe-house was built in 1820, the Board having granted a loan of £600 and a gift of £200. The glebe comprises 28 acres, valued at £56 per annum; and there is also a glebe of 12 1/2 acres at Piercetown, valued at £24, 10. per annum. In the R. C. divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Rathconrath, also called Miltown. There is a pay school, in which are about twelve children.

AMBROSETOWN, a parish, in the barony of BARGY, county of WEXFORD, and province of LEINSTER, 6 miles (S. by W.) from Taghmon; containing, with the extra-parochial townlands of Ballingeal and Rochestown, 1045 inhabitants. This parish comprises 2274 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act: it is partly under tillage and partly in pasture, and contains an entirely exhausted bog, part of which has been reclaimed and is now under cultivation, and the remainder is grazed. It is a rectory, in the diocese of Ferns, and forms part of the union of Duncormuck: the tithes amount to £138. 9. 2 3/4. In the R. C. divisions it is partly within the union or district of Rathangan, or Duncormuck, but chiefly in that of Carrig. A school, in which are about 50 boys and 30 girls, is aided by Mr. Morgan, of Johnstown; and there is a private school of about 20 children.

 

ANBALLY, a village, in the parish of KILMOYLAN, barony of CLARE, county of GALWAY, and province of Connaught, 7 miles (S.) from Tuam, on the road to Galway, containing 224 inhabitants. It consists of 54 cottages, and is only remarkable for the ruins of an ancient castle in excellent preservation, which, during winter, are completely surrounded by water from the turlough in the immediate vicinity.

ANDREW'S (ST.), a parish, in the barony of ARDES, county of DOWN, and province of ULSTER, comprising the post-town of Kirkcubbin, and containing, with the parishes of Ballywalter or Whitechurch, Ballyhalbert, and Innishargy, 7618 inhabitants. This parish, together with those which are now united with it, formed part of the possessions of a Benedictine monastery founded as a cell to the abbey of St. Mary, at Lonley, in Normandy, by John de Courcey, who died in 1210; and though designated, in the charter of foundation, the abbey of St. Andrew de Stokes, is more generally known by the appellation of the Black Abbey. It was seized into the king's hands as an alien priory in 1395, and was granted to the Archbishop of Armagh, who annexed it to his see; and after the dissolution it fell into the hands of the O'Neils. On the rebellion of O'Neil it escheated to the crown, and was granted to Sir James Hamilton, who assigned it to Sir Hugh Montgomery, Lord of the Ardes; but in 1639 it was finally awarded to the Archbishop of Armagh. The parishes of Ballywalter or Whitechurch, Ballyhalbert, and Innishargy are all included under the general name of St. Andrew's, and comprise, according to the Ordnance survey, 12,907 statute acres, of which 4012 are in St. Andrew's (including Ballyhalbert) and its islands. The land is fertile and in a high state of cultivation; but the fences are in bad condition, and in many places the system of draining is very inefficient. A large quantity of bog has been lately reclaimed by the Rev. Hugh Montgomery, which is now under cultivation and produces good crops. There are several gentlemen's seats, of which the principal are Spring Vale, the residence of G.Matthews, Esq.; Echlinville, of J. Echlin, Esq.; Glastry, of F. Savage, Esq.; and the Roddens, of J. Blackiston, Esq., all handsome and spacious mansions ornamented with thriving plantations. The post-town of Kirkcubbin is situated on the shore of Strangford Lough, on the west, and is separately described; and off the coast, on the east, are two islets, called respectively Green Island and Bur or Burrial, the former connected with the shore by a strand which is dry at low water; and the latter is remarkable as being the most eastern point of land in Ireland. There are some yawls and fishing smacks belonging to these islands; and about a mile to the north of Green Island is John's port, a small harbour for fishing boats, sheltered by a rock, called the Plough. On this coast is also a creek called doughy bay, having a bottom of clean sand; it has several fishing boats and wherries, and a coast-guard station has been established there, which is one of the twelve forming the district of Donaghadee. At the commencement of the last century, the churches of these parishes were in ruins; and, in the 2nd of Anne, an act was obtained for uniting the parishes and erecting a church in the centre of the union. The living is denominated the vicarage of St. Andrew's, or the union of Ballywalter, in the diocese of Down, and in the patronage of the Lord-Primate: the tithes amount to £1200, of which, £800 is payable to the Primate, as rector, and £400 to the vicar. The church, a spacious structure, was erected in the year 1704. The glebe-house, a handsome residence close to the town of Kirkcubbin, and about 2 1/4 miles from the church, was built about 50 years since, and has been greatly improved by the Rev. F. Lascelles, the present incumbent, at an expense of nearly £400: the glebe comprises about 30 acres, valued at £77. 18. per annum. In the R. C. divisions this union forms part of the district of Upper Ardes, also called Portaferry. There are three places of worship for Presbyterians in connection with the Synod of Ulster, situated respectively at Ballywalter, Kirkcubbin, and Glastry, all of the second class; one at Ballyhamlin in connection with the Remonstrant Synod, and one for Independents. There are six schools, two of which are supported by Lord Dufferin and J. Echlin, Esq., respectively, and two are infants' schools, supported by Miss Keown. In these schools are about 550 children of both sexes; and there are also four private schools, in which are about 100 boys and 80 girls. The sum of £50 per ann., payable out of the estate of Ballyatwood, was bequeathed by the Countess of Clanbrassil for clothing the poor on that estate. At Cloughy are the extensive ruins of a commandery of the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem, founded in 1189, by Hugh de Lacie, and called Castlebuoy; not far from which are the ruins of Slane church. Kirkstown castle, a heavy pile of building, erected in the reign of Jas. I., is in tolerable repair, and the tower in excellent preservation.-- See KIRKCUBBIN.

ANEY, or KNOCKANEY, a parish, in the barony of SMALL COUNTY, county of LIMERICK, and province of MUNSTER, 3 miles (E.) from Bruff; containing 4542 inhabitants, of which number, 514 are in the village. This place, which is situated on the river Commogue, and bounded on the north by Lough Gur, appears to have been distinguished at a very early period of Irish history. Its parish church and a monastery, or college, are said, by ecclesiastical writers, to have been founded about the time of St. Patrick; but the earliest authentic notice of the place occurs in 941, when a convent for nuns of the order of St. Augustine was founded, but by whom is not recorded. This establishment, which was called Monaster-ni-Cailliagh Juxta Aney, and was situated on Lough Gur, was destroyed in the Danish irruption, but was refounded, in 1283, by a branch of the Fitzgibbon family, and appears to have subsisted till the dissolution of the building, only some small fragments are remaining. In 1226, a preceptory was founded here, which subsequently became the property of the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem; and, in 1349, a friary for Eremites of the order of St. Augustine was founded by John Fitzgerald, or, as he was sometimes called, Fitz-Robert, which, after the dissolution, was granted by Queen Elizabeth to Edward, John and Mary Absley. This place was equally celebrated for its numerous stately castles; the most important was a spacious and very strong fortress, erected in 1248 by John Fitzgerald, sometimes called John of Callan, on the western bank of the river Commogue, in which the founder died in 1296; some very inconsiderable fragments only are remaining. In the fourteenth century the same powerful family erected two very strong castles on the shores of Lough Gur, called respectively Doon and the Black castle, to defend the two entrances to Knockadoon, a lofty eminence nearly surrounded by the lake, and by most writers considered as an island. The present castle of Doon, supposed to have been erected on the site of the original by Sir George Boucher, in the reign of Jas. I., is in a very perfect state; but the Black castle is a heap of ruins. A smaller castle was built in the village, soon after the erection of those on Lough Gur, probably by the family of O'Grady, who also built a very extensive castle at Kilballyowen: the former is, with the exception of the roof, in a very perfect state; and the latter has been incorporated with the modern dwelling-house, and contains four rooms in perfect order. Though the surrounding neighbourhood is fertile, and the inhabitants in general opulent, yet the village, which is the property of the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, and of the Earls of Aldborough and Kenmare, is in a state of neglect and ruin. The parish comprises 8312 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act: the land is remarkably productive, particularly round Kilballyowen; about one-fifth is under tillage, more than three-fifths are meadow and pasture land, and there is a small tract of very valuable bog. The great fertility of the soil seems to have obviated the necessity of paying much attention to the improvement of agriculture, which throughout the district is generally disregarded. The surface is adorned with rich plantations: the principal seats are Kilballyowen, the residence of De Courcy O'Grady, Esq. (who retains the ancient title of O'Grady of Kilballyowen), a handsome modern building in a richly planted demesne; Elton, of Mrs. Grady; Lough Gur Castle, of Miss Bailie; Baggotstown, of J. Bouchier, Esq.; Milltown Lodge, of T. D. O'Grady, Esq.; and Rathaney, of T. Bennett, Esq. The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Emly, with the vicarages of Ballynard, Ballynamona, Long or Knocklong, Kilfrush, Ballinlough, and Hospital, which seven parishes constitute the union of Aney, in the patronage of the Crown during the legal incapacity of the Earl of Kenmare; the rectory is impropriate in E. Deane Freeman, Esq. The tithes amount to £860, of which £573. 6. 8. is payable to the impropriator, and the remainder to the vicar; and the entire tithes of the benefice amount to £748. 0. 4 1/2. The church is a neat edifice, with a handsome octagonal spire of hewn stone, and the Ecclesiastical Commissioners have lately granted £183 for its repair. The glebe-house, nearly adjoining the church, but not habitable for a family, is built on a glebe of 7a. 1r. 38p. The R. C. parish is coextensive with that of the Established Church, the chapel is in the village of Aney, and has been rebuilt and was consecrated on the 9th of October, 1836; there is also another at St. Patrick's Well. There is a school aided by a donation from the parish, which is held in the R. C. chapel 5 and a school is also supported by the Count de Salis. In these schools are about 220 boys and 130 girls; and there is also a pay school of 20 boys and 8 girls. Lough Gur, the only lake of importance in the county, is about four miles in circumference, and bounds the parish for nearly three miles; it has two beautiful small islands, and is of very picturesque and romantic character. On one of the islands are the remains of ancient fortifications; and midway between Knockadoon and Knockfennel is the other, about three-quarters of an acre in extent, which was strongly fortified, and the walls are now nearly in a perfect state. Not far from the Black castle are the interesting ruins of the New Church, so called from its being founded by the Countess of Bath, when resident at Doon Castle, by whom it was also endowed with £20 per annum for the support of a chaplain; but the property having descended to the Count de Salis, and the church not being registered in the diocesan records, that nobleman discontinued the appointment of a chaplain, and the church has fallen into ruins. The plate presented to this church by the Countess of Bath is now used in the parish church of Aney. At St. Patrick's well are some remains of a church, with an extensive burial-ground; and near Elton are also some fragments of another, in a churchyard. Not far distant are the picturesque ruins of Baggotstown castle, built by one of the Baggot family in the reign of Chas. I., and forming, with its lofty gables and chimneys, a singular object when viewed from a distance. On the hill of Knockadoon, just over the lake, are some rude traces of an ancient fortress.

ANHID, or ATHNETt, a parish, in the barony of COSHMA, county of LIMERICK, and province of MUNSTER, 1 1/4 mile (S.) from Croom; containing 475 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the western bank of the river Maigue, and on the new road from Charleville to Limerick, by way of Croom, comprises 928 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act. The land is very fertile: about one-half of it is under tillage, and the remainder is good meadow and pasture. A new line of road is now in progress from Croom to Charleville, which will be intersected by the direct mail coach road from Cork to Limerick. Athnett is a prebend in the cathedral church of St. Mary, Limerick, which has, from time immemorial, been annexed to the bishoprick, and gives to the bishop a seat in the chapter: the tithes amount to £42. There is neither church nor glebe-house. In the R. C. divisions it forms part of the union or district of Croom.

ANNADUFF, or ANNAGHDUFF, a parish, partly in the barony of MOHILL, but chiefly in that of LEITRIM, county of LEITRIM, and province of CONNAUGHT; containing, with the post-town of Drumsna, 5858 inhabitants. This place is situated on the mail coach road from Dublin to Sligo, and on the river Shannon, which here forms the beautiful and picturesque loughs of Bodarig and Boffin. An abbey was founded here in 766; but there are no further accounts of it, and the only vestiges are a few curious stones worked into the window in the south gable of the ancient parish church, the ruins of which are in the present churchyard. In the reign of Jas. II. a skirmish took place here between the partisans of that monarch and the troops of Wm. III., at a ford over the river Shannon, near Derrycarne, and the spot is still called James's Heap. The parish comprises 8428 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act, and valued at £6871. 4. 10. per annum: it is principally under an improving system of tillage. There is a tract of bog, affording a good supply of fuel: limestone of inferior quality is quarried, and freestone is found in the vicinity of Drumod. Iron ore exists in various parts, particularly near Drumod. The principal seats are Mount Campbell, the handsome residence of Admiral Sir Josias Rowley, Bart.; Derrycarne, of F. Nisbett, Esq., surrounded by a well-planted demesne and picturesquely situated between the two loughs, Bodarig and Boffin; Lismoyle, of T. Waldron, Esq.; and the residence of Messrs. Walsh, near Drumsna, commanding extensive views of the Shannon and surrounding country. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Ardagh, and in the patronage of the Bishop: the tithes amount to £262. 13. 1. The church is a neat edifice, in the later English style, with a square tower crowned with minarets, for the erection of which the late Board of First Fruits, in 1815, granted a loan of £1600. There is also a chapel of ease at Drumod. The glebe-house is a good residence, and the glebe comprises 300 acres. The R. C. parish is co-extensive with that of the Established Church: the chapel, at Aughamore, is in a very bad state of repair, and it is in contemplation to erect a new one as soon as a convenient site can be obtained. Divine service is also performed in a school-house. There are four schools, affording instruction to about 120 boys and 180 girls; also six pay schools, in which are about 270 boys and 100 girls, and two Sunday schools.-- See DRUMOD and DRUMSNA.

ANNAGASSON, a village, in the parish of DRUMCAR, barony of ARDEE, county of LOUTH, and province of LEINSTER, 8 miles (S.) from Dundalk; containing 235 inhabitants. This place is situated on a pleasant beach, forming part of Dundalk bay; it comprises 38 houses, which are neatly built, and the handsome residence of Robert Thompson, Esq., who has some extensive mills, and is proprietor of the shipping, which afford employment to the inhabitants. The river Drumcar abounds with salmon and trout, and is here crossed by a substantial bridge. There is a beautiful drive along the sea-side to Dundalk, and to Clogher Head, where regattas are annually held; and the view of the bay and the sea, with steam-boats and other craft daily passing and repassing, give an air of cheerfulness to the place. The principal import is coal for the supply of the neighbourhood. Fairs are held on March 17th, May 7th, July 22d, and Nov. 8th.-- See DRUMCAR.

ANNAGELIFFE, a parish, in the barony of UPPER LOUGHTEE, county of CAVAN, and province of ULSTER, 1 mile (N. E. by E.) from Cavan, on the road from that place to Virginia; containing 4341 inhabitants. It comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 8260 1/4 statute acres, of which 5096 are applotted under the tithe act. The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Kilmore, forming, with that of Urney, the union of Urney and Annageliffe, in the patronage of the Bishop; the rectory is impropriate in the Representatives of Richard, Earl of Westmeath. The tithes amount to £217. 16. 11 1/2., of which £62. 2. 2 1/2. is payable to the impropriator, and £155. 14. 9. to the vicar. In the R. C. divisions this parish forms part of the union or district of Urney, or, as it is more commonly called, Cavan: the chapel is a large building, situated at Stragolla. There are a parochial school, and a school on the townland of Curlurgan; also four hedge schools.

ANNAGH. or BELTURBEt, a parish, partly in the barony of LOWER LOUGHTEE, but chiefly in that of TULLAGHGARVEY, county of CAVAN, and province of ULSTER, on the road from Ballyconnell to Cavan; containing, with the greater part of the market and post-town of Belturbet, 12,269 inhabitants. It comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 19,145 1/4; statute acres, of which 12,340 are in Tullaghgarvey; about 16,000 are arable and pasture, 2000 are bog and waste, 300 are woodland, and 200 are common: of its entire area, 14,936 acres are applotted under the tithe act. The principal seats are Castle Saunderson, the residence of A. Saunderson, Esq.; Erne Hill, of G. M. Knipe, Esq.; Clover Hill, of J. Saunderson, Esq.; and Red Hill, of -- White, Esq. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Kilmore, and in the patronage of Lord Farnham: the tithes amount to £384. 4. 7 1/2. The church is a handsome edifice, for the repairs and enlargement of which the late Board of First Fruits granted £2600, in 1812 and 1814; and the Ecclesiastical Commissioners have recently granted £112 for its further repair. The glebe-house was purchased y aid of a loan of £844, in 1810, from the same Board; the glebe comprises 400 acres. In 1813, forty-seven townlands of he parish were disunited, to form the perpetual cure of Killoughter. This parish is divided into the two R. C. districts of Annagh West and Annagh East, or Killoughter, the former containing a chapel at Drumalee, and the latter at Red Hill. There are two places of worship for Wesleyan Methodists, one of which belongs to the Primitive class. A school is supported by the Trustees of Erasmus Smith's charity; and there are schools at Drumlaney, Killoughter, and Drumloor; also an infants' and two other schools, besides six private pay schools. The ruins of the old church yet exist.-- See BELTURBET.

ANNAGH, or ST. ANNA, a parish, in the barony of TRUGHENACKMY, county of KERRY, and province of MUNSTER, 65 miles (W. S. W.) from Tralee; containing, with the town of Blennerville, 3253 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the bay of Tralee, and on the high road from Tralee to Dingle, extends for some miles between a chain of mountains and the sea, and comprises 17,967 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act, about 11,400 of which consist of rough mountain pasture, and the remainder of arable land. It is a rectory, in the diocese of Ardfert and Aghadoe, and forms part of the union of Ballynahaglish: the tithes amount to £332. 6. 1. The church, situated in the town of Blennerville, is a neat modern structure with a square tower; and about half a mile distant are the ruins of the old church, with the burial-ground, in which is a stone bearing a rude effigy of an armed horseman. There is neither glebe nor glebe-house. In the R. C. divisions it is included in the unions of Tralee and Bally-macelligot; the chapel is at Curragheen, l 1/2 mile to the west of Blennerville. A school is supported by the R. C. clergyman; and at Curragrague is one under the Trustees of Erasmus Smith's charity; in which, together, are about 170 boys and 110 girls.-- See BLENNERVILLE.

ANNAGH, a parish, in the barony of COSTELLO, county of MAYO, and province of Connaught, on the road from Castlebar to Frenchpark; containing, with the post-town of Ballyhaunis, 6885 inhabitants. This place was chiefly distinguished for a cell of Franciscan friars, though by some writers said to have been founded by Walter de Burgh for brethren of the order of St. Augustine, as a cell to the abbey of Cong, and to have been the burial-place of Walter, Lord Mac William Oughter, who was interred here in 1440. The parish comprises 16,325 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act: it is principally under tillage; and there is a sufficient quantity of bog. Logboy is the residence of E. Nolan, Esq., and Hollywell, of J. Bourke, Esq. A weekly market and annual fairs are held at Ballyhaunis, which see. It is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Tuam, and forms part of the union of Kiltullagh: the tithes amount to £194. 19. 11. The R. C. parish is co-extensive with that of the Established Church; there are chapels at Ballyhaunis and Tulrahan. The old monastery at the former place is still occupied by friars of the order of St. Augustine. There are eight pay schools in the parish, in which are about 390 boys and 230 girls.

ANNAGH, an island, in the parish of KILCOMMON, barony of ERRIS, county of MAYO, and province of Connaught, 23 miles (S. by E.) from Belmullet; containing 6 inhabitants. This island is situated in the bay of Tulloghane, on the western coast, and near the entrance of the sound of Achill; it is separated from the mainland of Ballycroy by a narrow sound to which it gives name, and is the property of Sir Richard O'Donnell, Bart., from whom it is rented by the inhabitants of the village of Claggan-Caferky. The greater portion of the land is mountainous, but affords very good pasture; and there is a salmon and herring fishery, which, if properly managed, might be rendered very lucrative.

ANNAGHCLONE.-- See ANACLOAN.

ANNAGHDOWN, or ENAGHDUNE, a parish, in the barony of CLARE, county of GALWAY, and province of Connaught, 7 1/2 miles (N.) from Galway, on the road from Galway to Headford; containing 6093 inhabitants. This parish is bounded on the west by Lough Corrib, and comprises 16,508 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act. It is a place of considerable antiquity, and was formerly the seat of an independent bishoprick, of which some notice will be found in the account of the archiepiscopal see of Tuam, with which it has for centuries been incorporated. St. Brendan of Clonfert built a nunnery here under the invocation of the Blessed Virgin, for his sister Briga, which, in 1195, was confirmed by Pope Celestine III., together with the town of Kelgel, to nuns of the Arroasian order: at the suppression it was granted to the Earl of Clanricarde. An abbey, dedicated to St. Mary, and called the abbey of St. Mary de portu patrum, was founded at an early period for White Premonstratensian canons; and here was a Franciscan friary, the head of a custody, to which the monasteries of Connaught and Ulster were subordinate. There was also another religious house, called the College of St. Brendan, in which four priests or vicars were supported, and which was not subjected to royal inquisition until the 28th of Elizabeth; and at Kilcoonagh, in the vicinity, was an abbey, which Tipraid, Prince of Hy Fiacria, granted to St. Columb, who placed over it St. Cuannan, from whom it derived its name. The seats are Cregg Castle, that of Fras. Blake, Esq., and Waterdale, of Jas. Blake, Esq. The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Tuam, to which those of Killascobe and Laccagh are episcopally united, and in the patronage of the Archbishop; the rectory is impropriate in John Kirwan, Esq. The tithes amount to £553. 16. 11 1/4., of which £138. 9. 3. is payable to the impropriator, and the remainder to the incumbent; and of the entire union, to £675. 9. 4 3/4, The church is a small neat building, for the erection of which the late Board of First Fruits gave £500, in 1798. The glebe-house was also built by aid of a gift of £350 and a loan of £450, in 1818, from the same Board: the glebe comprises 20 acres. The R. C. parish is coextensive with that of the Established Church: the chapel is at Corondola, and divine service is also regularly performed in a school-house at Woodpark. Schools at Annaghdown and Woodpark were each endowed with £100 late currency by the Rev. Redmond Hardagan, for the gratuitous instruction of 30 children in each; about 160 children are at present taught in these schools. There are also six hedge schools, in which are about 300 children; and a Sunday school is supported by the vicar.

ANNAMOE, a village, in the parish of DERRALOSSORY, barony of BALLINACOR, county of WICKLOW, and province of LEINSTER, 6 1/4 miles (S. W.) from Newtown-Mount-Kennedy; containing 67 inhabitants. This small village is situated in a sequestered spot, where a small valley opens on the east into the beautiful and romantic vale through which the river Annamoe flows in its descent from Lough Dan. The scenery is richly diversified, and in the vicinity are several gentlemen's seats, among which is Castle Kevin, the residence of Dr. Frizell, occupying a lofty eminence richly planted with firs and other forest trees, and commanding an extensive and delightful view. About half a mile to the northwest of the village is Dromeen, the seat of Captain Hugo, situated in a demesne tastefully laid out; near it is the glebe-house of Derralossory; and in the neighbourhood is Lara House, the residence of Robert Burrowes, Esq., from which is a most extensive mountain view. A daily penny post from Newtown-Mount-Kennedy has been established; and here is a small neat R. C. chapel belonging to the union or district of Glendalough. At a short distance up the valley, at the head of which the village is situated, is the site of Castle Kevin, supposed to have been originally built by the O'Tooles, a spacious quadrangular area encompassed by a deep ditch and rampart, which, with some of the foundations, is all that remains of that ancient fortress. Lawrence Sterne, when a child, was on a visit with his father at the parsonage-house for about six months, during which period occurred the circumstance which he relates of his falling through a mill-race, while the mill was at work, and being taken up unhurt.-- See DERRALOSSORY.

ANNAMULt, otherwise AGHNAMOLt, a parish, in the barony of SHILLELOGHER, county of KILKENNY, and province of LEINSTER, 6 miles (S.) from Kilkenny; containing 458 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Nore, which here receives the King's river, on the high road from Stoneyford to Kilkenny by Bennett's-Bridge, and contains 1664 statute acres. An extensive Merino factory for superfine cloth, with a farm attached, was established here about 20 years since, at an expense, including the machinery, of nearly £30,000, and a further sum of £10,000 was subsequently expended on additional buildings and machinery. This excellent establishment, in which about 800 persons were employed and every process of the manufacture was carried on, was conducted on a plan which afforded to the children of the neighbouring peasantry the means of acquiring not only a knowledge of the trade, but also an useful elementary education; but from unavoidable losses and want of sufficient encouragement the undertaking was abandoned by its projectors, in 1822, and the works were subsequently taken by a firm in Dublin and Leeds, which, in 1826, being unable to obtain a satisfactory lease, discontinued them, and they are now unoccupied. Except about 25 acres of woodland attached to Annamult, the handsome residence of T. Neville, Esq., and to the residence of the Rev. Dr. Butler, the lands are all arable and pasture; about one-half are held immediately from Major Wemyss, and the other half under the lessees of Sir .J. Blunden, Bart. The parish is tithe-free: it is a rectory, in the diocese of Ossory, and forms part of the union of Kells. In the R. C. divisions it is united to Danesfort.

ANNASCALL, or AUNASCALL, a hamlet, in the parish of BALLINACOURTY, barony of CORKAGUINEY, county of KERRY, and province of MUNSTER, 9 miles (E. by N.) from Dingle; containing 11 houses and 92 inhabitants. This place is situated in a pleasant valley on the new mail coach road from Tralee to Dingle, to each of which it has a penny post recently established. It is a constabulary police station; and petty sessions are held generally on alternate Mondays. The parish church, a small plain edifice with a square tower, is situated here; and a R. C. chapel has been recently erected. In the vicinity is a beautiful lake, about a mile in circumference; and in a glen among the mountains in its neighbourhood, bordering on Ballyduff, it is said the last wolf in Ireland was killed; the particular spot is called the "Wolf Step."-- See BALLINACOURTY.

ANNESBOROUGH.-- See DROMARAGH.

ANNESTOWN, a village, in the parish of DUNHILL, barony of MIDDLETHIRD, county of WATERFORD, and province of MUNSTER, 6 miles (S. W.) from Tramore; containing 232 inhabitants. This place is situated on the south coast, and on the western side of a pleasant valley, which extends for a considerable distance inland. The village contains 31 houses, and possesses some natural advantages as a place of resort during summer; and a few lodging-houses have been established for the accommodation of visiters. Its situation and appearance are highly picturesque; the vicinity presents an extensive line of coast, consisting of stupendous rocks rising abruptly from the sea. On the east the view is bounded by the isles of Icane, and on the opposite side the headland of Dungarvan is seen stretching far to the southwest. The parish church, a neat edifice, erected by aid of a gift of £900 from the late Board of First Fruits, in 1822, is situated in the village.-- See DUNHILL.

 

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