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Tuatha Dé Danann.

 

Irish Fairies.
 
Fairies of the Irish Mythology From The Irish Fireside, Volume 1, Number 24, December 10, 1883
Shee or Fairies and their Dwellings From A Smaller Social History of Ireland by Patrick Weston Joyce.
The Burning of Bridget Cleary From Five Years in Ireland, 1895-1900 by Michael J. McCarthy, 1901
Witchcraft in Carrickfergus From The Dublin Penny Journal, Volume 1, Number 47, May 18, 1833
Witchcraft in Kilkenny From the Dublin Penny Journal, Vol. 1, No. 10, September 1, 1832
Witchcraft in Kilkenny From The Dublin Penny Journal, Volume 1, Number 43, April 20, 1833

In Irish mythology the Tuatha Dé Danann, were said to be the descendants of the great mother-goddess Dana. With her consort Bilé she engendered a race of gods. They were the ancestors of one of the early peoples of Ireland who were vanquished and became the “fairy” inhabitants of the land. Dana’s divine offspring include the smith god Goibhniu, the ancestral king Nuadhu Airgedlamh (Of the silver hand), and Oghma, god of writing and eloquence, from whom we get the Ogham alphabet.

Belief in faries and fairy lore is stronger in Ireland than any other part of Europe, the otherworld community is known in Irish as the people of sî this word origionally siginified a tumulus or burial mound.

In Irish mythology the Tuatha Dé Danann, were said to be the descendants of the great mother-goddess Dana. With her consort Bilé she engendered a race of gods. They were the ancestors of one of the early peoples of Ireland who were vanquished and became the “fairy” inhabitants of the land. Dana’s divine offspring include the smith god Goibhniu, the ancestral king Nuadhu Airgedlamh (Of the silver hand), and Oghma, god of writing and eloquence, from whom we get the Ogham alphabet.

Belief in faries and fairy lore is stronger in Ireland than any other part of Europe, the otherworld community is known in Irish as the people of sî this word origionally siginified a tumulus or burial mound.

 
Read about Fairies from A Smaller Social History of Ancient Ireland by P W Joyce